Tales From the Bitface (Posts about searching)https://devilgate.org/enContents © 2020 <a href=”mailto:martin@devilgate.org”>Martin McCallion</a> Thu, 11 Jun 2020 11:58:08 GMTNikola (getnikola.com)http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rssURLs and searchinghttps://devilgate.org/blog/2015/03/16/urls-and-searching/Martin McCallion<div><p></p><h4>URL hiding</h4> <p>A while ago, I read a piece called “<a href=”http://jakearchibald.com/2014/improving-the-url-bar/”>Improving the URL Bar</a>” (turns out it’s almost a year old, but never mind). I made both mental and <a href=”https://pinboard.in/”>Pinboard</a>-based notes of it, because my response to it was, “That’s not improving the URL bar, it’s destroying it.”</p> <p>Reading it again now, I don’t feel quite so strongly; I partly agree with what the author was getting at. But I feel we lose something important as we make URLs less visible. They show something of the hierarchy of a site, its structure — or at least that’s the origin of the path part.</p> <p>The argument against that of course is that the path part is an implentation detail that doesn’t need to be seen by users, and perhaps more importantly, the whole thing is meaningless at best, confusing at worst to most users.</p> <p>Well, maybe so. But to those of us who <em>do</em> understand them, hiding them can be confusing, even annoying.Of course you can click in the URL bar, or press Cmd-L or Ctrl-L, to see the whole thing. More usefully, In Safari, which I’m currently using, there’s a preference called “Show full website address”, which overrides the behaviour. So you can have your choice.</p> <h4>Searching</h4> <p>But then there’s this whole thing that we have now, of browsers doing a search when you type something in URL bar; especially (though not exclusively) when it’s not obviously a URL that you’ve typed or pasted.</p> <p>I don’t like it.</p> <p>Or I didn’t. I’ve been using Safari since I wiped and reinstalled this Mac because it was getting really slow (successfully, I might add). I decided to keep things as stock as possible (within reason — I wasn’t going to switch back from Lightroom to iPhoto, for example, or from MailMate to Mail.app). And Firefox can sometimes be a bit of a resource hog.</p> <p>But I spent quite some time trying to find out how to give Safari a separate search bar like FF has (or can have — it may be a plugin, but if so it’s one that I install without thinking). I had muscle memory that went Cmd-T, Cmd-K (or Ctrl-T, Ctrl-T when I’m on Windows) when I want a new tab I’m going to search in. Still have it, actually, because I still use FF on Windows on my work machine.</p> <p>It turns out that you can’t have that on Safari. You just have to search from the URL bar. So I just got into the habit of doing that. And now I find I do it even on Firefox (you have both options there).</p> <p>I don’t know; I still feel that the URL bar should be for URLs, and searching should be something else. but it doesn’t offend me like it used to.</p> <p>Still, the effect is to further blur the distinction between searching for a site and going to a specific site. I see people — even experienced, technically knowledgable people — going to Google’s home page and typing “facebook.com” into the search box. I mean, what?</p> <p>Oh, and of course if you search from Google’s home page in Chrome, your cursor jumps to the URL bar! Or it did the last time I used Chrome. Which blurs the distinction between site and browser, as well as between site and search.</p> <p>In the end it doesn’t matter that much — people mostly get where they mean to go — but by making it less than clear what is going on when we navigate around the web, we make it harder for people to understand how it’s all put together, and I think we lose something important in doing so.</p></div>browserssearchingtechurlswebhttps://devilgate.org/blog/2015/03/16/urls-and-searching/Mon, 16 Mar 2015 22:58:51 GMT